Energy Savings On The Farm

Energy Savings

Where can you easily and safely cut costs in your agricultural operations?  Let’s start with a familiar topic – energy savings.  Energy usage on the farm accounts for about 5 to 7 % of farm expenditures. Many farms operate on small profit margins well below 10%.  Reducing energy costs can make a real difference in those budgets.  We’ll examine some immediate fixes plus some long-term strategies that could save you thousands. Whether you’re actively trying to save energy costs or just starting to plan a strategy a few good practices can pay off today and for years to come. Let’s start with the quick fixes first.  No need to make a huge expenditure in equipment or new technology in order to start saving today.  We’ll look at ways to save energy costs – especially electric bills with little or no additional costs – only savings!

 

Start with Cleaning

Sounds too simple, but it can be an effective way to save on going energy costs without having to make a large investment. Cleaning fan blades and shutters used in ventilation can increase efficiency by 40%. Cleaning doesn’t need to stop with fan blades and vents.  To increase your effective use of electrcity at no extra cost, be sure to clean light fixtures and bulbs to maintain good light levels. You and your coworkers will be able to see much better indoors making for a much safer workplace.  Not only will you be safer, but the surroundings will be safer for your animals.

 

 Regular Maintenance for Energy Savings

A good cleaning is just the beginning of the cost-effective ways to save energy dollars.  Along with cleaning. performing system tune-ups and regular maintenance on motors and pumps can be a great money saver in the long run.  Maintenance will not only increase their efficiency but may add more useful life to some expensive equipment. It costs less to clean than to repair.  It costs less to repair than to replace. A regular schedule of equipment cleaning and maintenance will go a long way toward building a foundation of smart energy usage and savings for years to come.

 

Turn It Off

Could this be any simpler? Turn off lights when they’re not in use. Using timers, photocells or motion sensors can make the job easier. In the same vein, turn down heating and air conditioning when buildings are not occupied or used. As with lighting, a programmable thermostat can adjust temperatures up and down on a timed schedule. You and your animals can be safe and comfortable without needing to break the bank to make major renovations.  Some simple steps can lead to real savings and a nice addition to your bottom line.  It’s great advice to make sure you’re always looking for new ways to increase your operation’s efficiency. Those savings can easily extend to your watering system. You can save time, labor and money with a Drinking Post Frost-free Automatic Livestock Waterer.

 

Non-Electric Waterer Energy Savings

You should know that Drinking Post Frost Free Automatic Livestock Waterers lead the field in non-electric waterers.  With an industry-leading innovative Drinking Post you’ve just eliminated the need for electric heating elements.  Use our Drinking Post Savings Calculator to see how much you can save by using Drinking Post non electric waters:  https://dpwaterer.com/waterer-electricity-savings-calculator/  If you are currently using electric heaters to keep water troughs from freezing, you’re spending a lot of money on something the Drinking Post does for free. No freezing water with a Drinking Post. You can say goodbye to breaking ice sheets in the watering trough each morning. You’ll also eliminate  electric heating elements that can drive your energy costs spiraling upwards, not to mention the ever-present danger of structure fires caused by malfunctioning heating elements. Safe, efficient, money-saving operation- that’s what you get with a Drinking Post.

 

Frost-Free

How does a Drinking Post stay frost-free?  The Drinking Post works and installs like the more familiar frost-free yard hydrant. By keeping the operating valve 18 inches below the frostline, the water is fresh and clean year-round, without the need for electricity. Unlike other cattle waterers, Drinking Post Waterers do not have standing water in the bowl. As a result, every drink is fresh, clean water that drains out of the bowl after every use.  Since the Drinking Post fills and drains with each animal’s use, it stays very clean as a result.  Imagine the simplicity!  There is never any standing water in the unit. It won’t grow algae, so you won’t have to worry about scrubbing algae in the summer. It won’t freeze so you won’t have to break the ice sheets in the watering trough every morning!

 

5 Year Warranty

A strong 8 inch exterior sleeve protects our frost-free automatic waterer. The Drinking Post is made of a synthetic plastic polymer which is very strong but has flex when needed. So, if cattle are leaning and rubbing, it will flex with the pressure instead of breaking. We do not get calls from customers saying their cow broke their Drinking Post, so this should not be a big concern. Recommended above ground height for cattle waterers is just below your smallest animal’s shoulder height, which means that most of the waterer will be supported and protected by ground cover and goes a long way to prevent breaking.  The best news of all to your bottom line: a new Ultimate Drinking Post comes with a 5-year warranty for all parts – structural and working parts.

Two More Benefits

Two more benefits to a non-electric waterer that we can’t forget.  Your animals will never have to face to threat of electric shock from their drinking water. Best of all, you’ve eliminated a major cause of barn fires by taking electricity out of the picture. Isn’t it time to save money and add safety to your operation?  Discover non electric waterer savings at: https://dpwaterer.com/shop/.   Be sure to visit Drinking Post on social media or share this article using the “Share this” links at the bottom of the page! Leave a comment below! We’d love to hear from you!

 

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